13 Fun Ways to Teach Holes by Louis Sachar

Holes Louis Sachar

Holes by Louis Sachar: What It’s about? Click HERE for the full lesson

Holes by Louis Sachar is a feel-good-coming-of-age novel that middle school level students love! It is about a boy named Stanley Yelnats, whose family has had a streak of bad luck for centuries. Stanley is accused of stealing some shoes (which he did not do) and ends up at Camp Green Lake. At the camp he meets a friend named Zero, and several other shady boys. The boys spend all of their time digging holes for the warden, who we later find out is trying to find buried money from a legendary story that arises from the past. It is a story about personal growth and friendship.

Holes Louis Sachar: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Holes Louis Sachar: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.
Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Holes Louis Sachar: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Holes Louis Sachar: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Holes Louis Sachar: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Holes Louis Sachar: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Holes Louis Sachar: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Holes Louis Sachar: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Holes Louis Sachar: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Holes Louis Sachar: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Have Fun With Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach “Holes” you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

15 Fun Ways to teach Linked Gordon Korman

Linked Gordon Korman

Linked Gordon Korman: What It’s about? HERE for the full lesson

Linked Gordon Korman is a modern book about how people respond to and honor the victims of the Holocaust. The main character, Link is a popular kid who everyone admires, and he decides to take a stand in defiance to those who are drawing swastikas all over campus at school. Link learns that he himself is Jewish and begins a journey of self-discovery even going as far as to plan a mar mativah for himself. We eventually learn that Link was the first one to draw a swastika and it ends in a story of redemption and forgiveness.

Linked Gordon Korman: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Linked Gordon Korman: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.
Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Linked Gordon Korman: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Linked Gordon Korman: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Linked Gordon Korman: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Linked Gordon Korman: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Linked Gordon Korman: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Linked Gordon Korman: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Linked Gordon Korman: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Linked Gordon Korman: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Have Fun With Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach “Linked” you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop Here

15 Fun Ways to Teach Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: What It’s about? HERE for the full lesson

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty is a fun and adventurous novel about two teens who steal a twenty out of a wallet the find. The woman is a millionaire and addresses the $20 that was stolen. She offers them a challenge to spend around 5 million dollars in one month and if they succeed, she will give them each 10 million dollars. We watch as the boys go from complete exhilaration to frustration, and heartache. They learn important lessons-one of them being that money isn’t everything. It has a lot of twists and turns and his a really fun read!

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.
Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Millionaires for the Month Stacy McAnulty: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Have Fun With Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach “Millionaires for the Month” you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

15 Fun Ways to Teach Omar Rising Aisha Saeed

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: What It’s about? HERE for the full lesson

Omar Rising is a feel-good-coming-of-age novel about a young teen who gets the opportunity to leave public school and attend a very prestigious-private academy. After working so hard to get into the academy he finds that they have almost impossible standards! They expect a 4.0 GPA for both semesters in order to maintains the scholarship program. Omar works really hard, doing extra chores the paying students don’t have to do, and studying all hours and days of the week, but he still falls short by an inch. Instead of taking the news laying down, Omar decides to do something about the impossible standards the academy sets for those who are on an academic scholarship. He makes numerous friends along the way and learns many important life lessons.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.
Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Omar Rising Aisha Saeed: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Have Fun With Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach “Omar Rising” you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

15 Fun Ways to Teach Roll with It Jamie Sumner

Roll with It Jamie Sumner

Roll with It! What It’s about? HERE for the full lesson

Roll with It Jamie Sumner is a feel-good-coming-of-age novel about a young teen who is suffering the usual things in middle school while also having cerebral palsy. She moves to her grandparents with her mother because her grandfather-that she loves dearly, has Altheimer’s. Once living at her grandparents, she meets new friends and goes on new adventures where she eventually finds peace, happiness, and even fun in life!

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.
Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Roll with It Jamie Sumner: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Have Fun With Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach “Roll with It” you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

15 Fun Ways to Teach Tight Torrey Maldonado

Tight Torrey Maldonado

What it’s about: Click HERE for the full lesson

Tight Torrey Maldonado is a coming-of-age novel about living in the projects. The protagonist of the story is an Afro-Puerto Rican young teen named Bryan. He is tempted throughout the novel, by a boy named Mike, to make bad decisions and has to constantly fight his instincts to give in down the path of trouble. It doesn’t help that his dad is in-and-out of jail which is traumatic for Bryan. Between his tumultuous homelife and a bad friend he has a hard time navigating the usual problems of a high school student.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Tight Torrey Maldonado: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Have Fun with Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach Tight you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

To read Nine, Ten: by Nora Raleigh Baskin click https://wordpress.com/post/teacher-for-inclusion.com/3755

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

15 Best Ways to Teach Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros

Efren Divided Ernest Cisneros

What it’s about: Click HERE for the full lesson

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros is a coming-of-age novel about a boy who lives in California. He lives with parents who are illegal aliens, and they are constantly on alert. One day his mom is taken back to Mexico and after some time she makes her way back across the border only to find herself landed in jail. Efren goes through the turmoil of a child who has lost a parent while trying to deal with the usual middle school issues.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Efren Divided Ernesto Cisneros: Have Fun with Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach Efren Divided you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

To read Nine, Ten: by Nora Raleigh Baskin click https://wordpress.com/post/teacher-for-inclusion.com/3755

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

15 Engaging Ways to Teach a Monster Calls Patrick Ness

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness
A Monster Calls Patrick Ness

What it’s about: Click HERE for the full lesson

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness is a heart-wrenching novel about a boy who is losing his mother to cancer. He goes through all the stages of grief which is manifested as a monster in his nightmares. When Conor sleeps he has nightmares about a monster who tells him stories. Eventually he has to face the fact that he has decided to let his mom go and die in peace.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

A Monster Calls Patrick Ness: Have Fun with Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach A Monster Calls you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

To read Nine, Ten: by Nora Raleigh Baskin click https://wordpress.com/post/teacher-for-inclusion.com/3755

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

15 Fun Ways to Teach Stargirl Jerry Spinelli

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli

What it’s about: Click HERE for the full lesson

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli is a book about a protagonist named Leo who looks back on an experience in his lifetime with a girl named Stargirl. Stargirl was different! She was eccentric, unique, and unstoppable. She would dance in the cafeteria and at a football game. He recalls her progression through high school beginning from when people were curious about her to hating her and he has regrets for how he treated her in trying to force her to conform to social norms.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

Stargirl Jerry Spinelli: Have Fun with Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dice and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dice, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach the Stargirl book you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

To Read a blog Called Nine, Ten: by Raleigh Baskin click https://wordpress.com/post/teacher-for-inclusion.com/3755

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

15 Best Ways to Teach the Call of the Wild Jack London

The Call of the Wild Jack London

What it’s about: Click HERE for the full lesson

The Call of the Wild Jack London is a feel-good novel about a man who is travelling and obtains a dog who is loyal and repeatedly saves his life. The dog should be wild but prefers the man’s company to his own. The dog eventually loses the man and ends up with a pack of wolves that become his family but not before this sad scene plays out.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Vocabulary

I start by passing out a vocabulary sheet in which students have the page number and the vocabulary word. Students are to write a simple synonym for the definition. I like to keep definitions as simple as possible because when you use long definitions there is a low chance of student retention.

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Journal Responses

Second, I have multiple journal responses that I use throughout the unit that are engaging and assess student comprehension.

  1. Some of the examples are to write a letter to a character. Tell them how you are similar or different. Tell them something you admire about them and why. This puts the students through the thought process of what empathy is like.
  2. Another journal response can be to Create a mock interview between yourself and a character. Create interview questions, practice and be prepared to present in front of the class.
  3. Students can Predict what will happen in the next chapter and craft a chapter from a character’s perspective in first person point of view. Be prepared to share the chapter with your classmates.
  4. Or, choose a significant incident in the book and write a journal entry from a character’s point-of-view
  5. You can ask them If you were given the opportunity to ask the author 5 questions what would they be? Write the questions below and explain why you want the answers to these questions.
  6. To assess setting students can create the setting in a drawing below. Be specific with details.
  7. Lastly draw a primary character and at least one secondary character in the box below. Be accurate in your drawing.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Reading Comprehension

  1. Visualize-I ask students to draw a symbol that best represents the book.
  2. Summarize-Students will summarize the book, a chapter, or a section of the book.
  3. Clarify-Students are to analyze where they lack an understanding of the book. They are to ask themselves, what do I need to re-read in order to fully comprehend the material?
  4. Connect-students ask themselves how the material connects to other material in the book and to other texts they have read.
  5. Respond-Students analyze how the author uses literary devices in the work and why.
  6. Question-Students are to make a list of questions they have for the author for further understanding.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Costa’s Question Cues

Next I have students create a list of high order thinking questions using Costa’s question cues. Some of Costa’s question stems begin with the following:

  1. Clarify
  2. Analyze
  3. Compare/contrast
  4. Evaluate
  5. Decide
  6. Interpret

You can collect these questions and answers and use them for a Socratic Seminar or a Four Corner Discussion. Pass out a list of the questions for students to work on at home. Have students return with their questions and answers. Elect two leaders to lead the discussion. Remain as an observer and allow for a meaningful discussion about the book.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Connections

I like to take connections with the book a step deeper because of the importance of engaging the students by connecting them with the material. I have students look up quotes of things that happen in the book that remind them of something from their own lives. They write the quote and begin a connection with something like, “This reminds me of a time that….” Students catalogue the quotes and connections as they read through the book.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Purpose of Reading

It is important to note the purpose of reading a text. Students are always asking “what is the point of this?” and there is only a positive outcome if a teacher takes the time to answer this question. Some purpose of reading questions can be:

  1. What are the characters’ motives or goals?
  2. What is the conflict?
  3. What am I visualizing?
  4. What is the message the author is trying to convey?
  5. What mood is the author creating?
  6. What problem is the character facing?
  7. How is the plot developing the story?
  8. Why did the author write this story?
  9. What themes are addressed in this text?
  10. What is your emotional response to the text?

Through analyzing and discussing the answers to these questions, you can come to a consensus as to what the purpose is of reading a text-even if it’s just for fun!

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Sentence Starters

The next assignment I have students complete throughout the reading are sentence starters. Sentence starters help students to analyze their own thinking and wonderment. Some examples of sentence starters are:

  1. I wonder…
  2. I was surprised that…
  3. I don’t really understand…
  4. I was reminded that…

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Exposition Writing

Some practice with writing an exposition can be done by simply using a statement and backing it up with evidence. For example, if we are to look at the statement “Parents should enocurage their kids to participate in a sport” then the evidence to back it up.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Compare/Contrast Characters

Another assignment worthy of a teacher’s attention is to compare contrast characters physical and emotional descriptions. You can utilize a graphic organizer to effectively list information.

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Close Reading Questions

It is highly effective to take a close reading passage from the book and have students analyze it by answering a list of carefully crafted sentences. A list of close reading sentences can look like this:

  1. What does this passage mean to you?
  2. Why do you think it is important to the text as a whole?
  3. What confuses you about the passage?
  4. Why is understanding this passage important to your response to the book as a whole?
  5. How does the passage connect to other ideas in the book?
  6. How does the author feeling about the ideas, characters or events they are presenting?
  7. Do the characters remind you of anyone else in fiction, history, or anyone else in your life?
  8. What is revealed about the characters you have read in this passage?

The Call of the Wild Jack London: Have Fun with Learning! Roll the Dice Activity

It is crucial that students have some fun while learning. A simple way to create some fun is by creating a “roll the dice” activity sheet. On a sheet of paper create the following activities:

  1. Paraphrase learned information in one sentence.
  2. Create a bookmark for today’s learning.
  3. Write original lyrics to a song that relates to today’s topic.
  4. Write four what if questions about the topic
  5. Create vocabulary cards for the five most essential terms
  6. Write an acrostic poem about the topic
  7. Write a letter to a family member or friend about the topic
  8. Create an analogy for today’s topic and an image
  9. Create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast information
  10. Summarize what you learned today to three classmates

Have students role dye and whichever number they land on they will complete as a group. If you only have once set of dye, you can roll for the whole class.

A One-Pager Assignment Project

The purpose of the one-pager assignment is to take a close look at the novel and analyze its themes, characters, quotes, etc.

The top half should focus on symbolism and themes using words and images. The bottom half should focus on key characters from the text and how they develop.

You may also use other symbols, drawings and words as you wish.

The border is themes. Students can get creative and maximize their efforts with a one-pager assessment.

Create a Plot Structure Diagram

Create a plot structure diagram using the mountain analogy with the following:

  1. Exposition
  2. Conflict
  3. Rising action
  4. Climax
  5. Falling action
  6. Resolution

6-Panel StoryBoard

Students can get a little creative and create a six-panel storyboard where they illustrate and write about a scene. They can also do an extension of a paragraph or the book.

Philosophical Chairs Discussion

Philosophical chair discussions are important in that they not only teach students to take a critical look at a topic but they learn how to express their opinions and evidence about the topic effectively. A great philosophical chairs discussion topic for this book is how our actions affect others. Have students choose a side, write about their opinions using evidence from the text and share their work in an articulate manner.

The Essay

A thorough final assessment can be the essay. For this particular book I would do a literary analysis or if you want to extend the philosophical chairs discussion, you can use the same topic from the philosophical chairs discussion.

However, you teach The Call of the Wild Jack London you are doing your students a service as it is a book worthy of attention and analysis. Get this full lesson in my TpT shop HERE

To read Nine, Ten: by Nora Raleigh Baskin click https://wordpress.com/post/teacher-for-inclusion.com/3755

Homepage | Novel Study School (teachable.com)